TBT to Boston Kiiiid

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TBT to Boston Kiiiid

Throwback Thursday to 2011 (or maybe Dec 2010), when a friend and form of inspiration, Mark Higgins had asked me if I could shoot a music video with him during the holiday break. I wasn't too surprised when he said it was the dropkicks, as he has a dense and cool history in the music scene, but I was honored that he asked me to tackle it with him. We shot it over the coarse of 2 days, not only had the band invited a ton of friends to be in the video, but among them were the fighter Mickey Ward, sportscaster Heidi Watney, comedian Lenny Clark, Shawn Thornton and Milan Lucic of the Bruins and a handful of other celebs who made themselves available for pickup shots.

We had staged a party/funeral in a local funeral home and sort of let the mayhem unfold, picking off shots and then stepping in to stage a few things here and there. For location 2 we had used the back of McGreevy's bar on Boylston St, owned in part by front man Ken Casey. The front of the bar remained open for patrons, who I'm sure must have heard this song 30 times before it even had the chance to hit the radio. It became very run and gun, as we were shoulder to shoulder, it was just like shooting in a crowded bar, but with patient and understanding customers. We had to just augment the lighting with some chimera soft boxes and a couple Arri Fresnels, tweaking them pretty much only for close ups. In between locations we grabbed shots at the beach, in local neighborhoods, anywhere that could play as a fun location for someone getting hit with a snowball, which was something that Ken added to the video the day of, and it played really well. 

Perhaps the coolest part was shooting in Fenway park, empty and filled with snow, it was really cool to pretty much have free reign to walk around this iconic field picking out a location to stage our next shot. Most of all access to locations we got was due to Ken Casey, he knows a lot of people and shows some serious hussle. Just days later, Mark had a cut ready, after he grabbed a few more pickups. I was eager to see it, and help him color, I like way the skintones turned out, they have a warm soft hue to them, it's part of the overall aesthetic that I find pleasing. Sometimes I miss Boston, watching this vid takes me back. 

-BWay

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Cinematography Giant

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Cinematography Giant

I have immense respect for Shane and what he has been doing, sharing his deep knowledge of all aspects of cinematography with astounding transparency. From grip gear, to lighting, through techniques, just ogling over the beauty of lenses, to diy, he unveils what he has learned in the industry to anyone interested. He'll even digitally take you on set daily, to the major movies he's working on and give you a first hand look at the daily challenges and how he overcomes them. 

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WEERRRRK QUEENS!

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WEERRRRK QUEENS!

We (ok just me, the guys not so much) have been obsessed with Rupaul's Drag Race for quite some time. And season 8 which just wrapped up did not disappoint! The winner for season 8 has been crowned already, and if you haven't finished watching I won't spoil it, but I will say that THIS graphic designer's favorite banchan dish and drag queen did not win :(

Even so, I'm loving the look of Ru's new music video featuring the top 3 queens!

Posted by Zoe B.

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Good, Thoughtful Insight into Media

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Good, Thoughtful Insight into Media

This guy gets it, he has an impressive amount of followers for the low number of videos he has published to his page. He's just seemingly exploring what he's interested in, and being in the industry he has a working knowledge that he seems to be tuned sharply. He's sharing the fruits from the journey of his findings with those who care to watch, which seems to be plenty.

Simply and effectively breaking down media and seeing the underlying art, or in some cases, the lack there of. With VO and nicely put together examples, choices, and juxtapositions that back up his case, it's like a little piece of fun film school on youtube.

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Night Beds is a good band to see live

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Night Beds is a good band to see live

This guy and his brother have a really nice vibe. Their music is sweet and humbling.  They are the kind of performers who really feel what they are doing and like the audience to feel it too.  They will come right into the crowd and lean their head on you or sing to you. Its in your face in a way that makes you feel human and good about it.

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Small Camera for Big Dreams

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Small Camera for Big Dreams

We love our cameras here at Routine, we also love looking at new possibilities and ways of achieving the shots we want without breaking the bank or our enthusiasm. What do you think of this little guy? I wonder how gradability will compare to the micro black magic camera. 

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The future of treating ACL tears: Less invasive surgery

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The future of treating ACL tears: Less invasive surgery

 

 

About 400,000 people a year tear their knee ligament. Dr. Martha Murray has an idea for a less-invasive repair.

By Shira Springer Globe Staff  November 08, 2014

 

Nearly three decades ago, a man on crutches changed the course of Dr. Martha Murray’s life. The two met at a party at Stanford University, where Murray was a graduate student in engineering. They talked about the man’s recent anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, tear. When he told Murray his reconstruction surgery would require a tendon graft and holes drilled into his thighbone and shinbone, she was shocked.

Murray wondered why surgeons couldn’t simply sew the two ends of the torn ligament back together and let it heal. The question nagged at her, led her to the university’s medical library for research, and, ultimately, resulted in a switch from engineering to medical school. Ever since, Murray has studied ACL tears and sought ways to help the ligament heal without grafts or holes drilled into bones. The result has been a sponge scaffold now ready for testing in human knees.

If all goes as hoped with human trials, the sponge scaffold could give athletes new, less invasive options for ACL repairs, particularly the young athletes Murray sees at her Boston Children’s Hospital practice where she works in the Division of Sports Medicine. Today, ACL tears are one of the most common knee injuries, especially among basketball and soccer players. Every year, approximately 400,000 people tear their ACLs in the United States. And women have a two to six times higher risk of suffering an ACL injury than males participating in the same sport.

That means a lot of patients could potentially benefit from Murray’s work. She discussed what it took to go from engineering student to designing structures that help ACLs heal themselves and what she hopes the future holds.

Q. What gave you the idea for the scaffold?

A. When the MCL [medial collateral ligament] tears, the two ends bleed and the blood forms a provisional scaffold between the two torn ends that the tissue then grows into and heals itself. . . . In the ACL, the ends bleed when it gets injured, but the blood can’t solidify. It can’t clot between the two ends of the ligament because of the fluid in the knee joint. So, you end up having these two torn ends washing around in this liquid instead of getting reconnected by a solidified blood clot. Once we figured that out, we developed a scaffold, basically like a sponge, that you can use to hold the blood between the two torn ends of the ACL long enough for the cells around and the tissue around to grow into it and reunite. When we do the repair of the ACL and we sew it back together, we sew it with the sponge between the two ends. Then, we can put some of the patient’s own blood onto that sponge. The sponge soaks up that blood and holds the blood which has all the right biology to stimulate healing. The sponge gets replaced over six to eight weeks with healing tissues. It’s there until it’s not needed anymore.

 

Q. You’ve seen the scaffold work on pigs’ knees which are very similar to human knees. When will human trials start?

A. We just got our approval from the FDA to try this in the first set of 10 patients. It’s called a safety study. It’s not even a phase one. It’s before that where you just try the technique to make sure there are no big red flags that you haven’t thought of or haven’t found in your preclinical testing. We’re hoping to be ready if somebody wants to try this by Jan. 1.

 

Q. What type of patient do you want for the safety study?

A. We’re looking for patients who are going to be 18 to 35 years old who have recently torn their ACL, within the last week or two. Because, unfortunately, when you tear your ACL, after a while it starts to break down and degrade. So, we want to have a tear that’s relatively new. We’re basically going to be posting flyers and talking to some of our colleagues and saying, “If you have a patient you think might be interested, could you let them know and let us know.” We’ll get in touch with them and explain the risks and benefits.

 

Q. The obvious big risk is that the scaffold doesn’t work. But what are some of the benefits of your new approach when compared to current ACL reconstruction surgeries?

‘We’re really trying to get people to stop thinking about cutting things out.’ - Dr. Martha Murray, Boston Children’s Hospital

 

A. First off, ACL reconstruction, as we do it now, is a pretty good operation. We can get the vast majority of our patients back to their sports. But one of the drawbacks is that, especially in teenagers, there’s a relatively high rate of tearing your graft. Somewhere around 20 percent. The other main drawback is we can’t prevent the arthritis that develops in the knee with an ACL reconstruction. We’d really like to stop that arthritis because a lot of our patients are in the 15- to 20-year-old range. If they get arthritis 15 years later, that means they’re 30 to 35 with kind of a bum knee. And that’s not such a great situation.

In the animal trials, the ones that had the repairs actually didn’t develop arthritis the way the animals that had a reconstruction or no treatment did. So, we’re hopeful that if we can save your own ACL and get that to heal rather than replacing that with something different, then maybe that will be a better long-term solution for the knee.

 

Q. Could the scaffold become the new standard in ACL surgery?

A. We’re really trying to get people to stop thinking about cutting things out and replacing them with synthetics or metal or something else. And instead to think about how can we work with the body’s own biology to get tissues to heal.

In a lot of orthopedics, if you think about the tissues that don’t heal, like meniscus and cartilage and ligaments, they all live in the joints. So, they all have this problem where they don’t have that early scaffold. We typically tend to trim them or get rid of them because we can’t get them to heal. But if we could find a way to put in a substitute scaffold that contains the right biologic cues to get these tissues to heal and we can save those tissues, that’s a different way to think about approaching the problem. Our relatively simple solution of a sponge and putting the blood there where it belongs may not be the final solution. If we can just get some really smart scientists to think this could work, then maybe they’ll design an even better scaffold or figure out an even better growth factor to put in there.

 

Q. How will the rehabilitation process with the sponge scaffold differ from the rehab process with ACL reconstruction?

A. What we’ve done is gotten advice from multiple physical therapists who have a lot of experience with ACL rehabilitation. We’ve told them about the project and they’ve helped us design a rehabilitation protocol that’s very similar to what you would do after an ACL graft. We’re going to try to progress through things in the protocol that are easy on the ACL up to things that are hard. We’re going to start basically with an ACL reconstruction rehabilitation protocol. Then, we’re going to see how that works. Is that too aggressive? Is that not aggressive enough? What do we need to do to modify it from there?

 

Q. So, you’re looking at the familiar six- to eight-month rehabilitation process before athletes can return to action. Will you have any earlier indicators that the sponge scaffold is or isn’t working in humans?

A. At three months, we’re planning to do an MRI of their knee. We’ve developed a technique using MRI that can help us predict how strong the repair is. So, we’ll be able to tell people early on that, “Yes, this looks like it’s working for you” or “No, we don’t think it’s working.” If it’s not working, they can start thinking about maybe having an ACL reconstruction if they’re anxious to get back to sports. We’re going to try to give the patient as much information early on as we can.

Shira Springer can be reached at springer@globe.com.

© 2015 Boston Globe Media Partners, LLC

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Skate

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Skate

When you are injured and unable to pursue your passions,  when you are strained by your responsibilities and distant from the activities you love.

Turn to content that would inspire you.  Take the jealousy it makes you feel and let it encourage you. Fill yourself with it until you can't stand it anymore.  Then explode with pursuit proving to yourself you can pull through and achieve whatever it is you want.

Don't forget the value of ones own happiness in the pursuit of life.

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Some good Advice from the Huff

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Some good Advice from the Huff

How to Get Through Difficult Times

Life's difficulties, large and small, can cause many people to get "stuck," give up or lose hope -- but not Arianna. She credits her mother, Elli, for teaching her the notion that even in life's most difficult moments, there is something wonderful waiting around the corner. One particular quote from the poet Rumi was among Elli's favorites, and it has stuck with Arianna for years:

"Live life as though everything is rigged in your favor."

When Arianna finds herself facing challenges or heartbreak, she uses this advice to help find the strength to continue moving forward. "I kept remembering that there's a hidden blessing somewhere," she says. "Even when things are darkest, I know there will be light."

How to View Failure

On her own path to success, Arianna has experienced her share of failures, which she has spoken about candidly in the past. For example, when she was shopping around her second book, it was rejected 36 times. Even one failure has the possibility of derailing one's dream, never mind 36, but Arianna has an interesting way of looking at "failure" so that it keeps her focused.

"See failure as not the opposite of success, but as a stepping stone to success," she says, again quoting her mother. "That way, when we fail, when we are rejected, we don't see this as the end."

How to Integrate Work and Life

Work-life balance is a hot topic these days, but Arianna believes that in order to achieve this, we have to rethink what it actually means. For starters, she says, "work-life integration" is a much better description.

"'Balance' makes us think that it's going to be 50/50, [like] we'll be able to spend equal time at work or at home," she explains. "The truth is life isn't like that... The important thing is your life and your work [are] integrated, by which I mean, are you consistently exhausted and burned out, or are you taking enough time to sleep, to meditate or renew yourself in whatever way works for you?"

How to Recognize When You're Burnt Out

Arianna says the key is to recognize when you've spread yourself too thin. To do this, she emphasizes the importance of listening to your body's cues when you are too tired.

"We've all gotten so used to being perpetually tired that we consider it the new normal," she says. "We are much more aware of how much battery remains in our smartphones than how much battery we have left.

"Once we become aware of the signs," she continues, "we can learn to course-correct much faster, so that stress and exhaustion don't become cumulative."

             - The Huffington Post

Here's the annoying website for more

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/05/arianna-huffington-ecourse-thrive_n_7213034.html

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